Tri-County Times

Features
Wednesday, August 9, 2006

Author to hold signing and discussion at book store
by Jan Rynearson Features Editor

Aaron's Crossing

Last June, the Tri-County Times published a book review on "Aaron's Crossing," written by Michigan author Linda Alice Dewey.

She was well received at a book signing at Little Professor Book Center of Fenton. On Aug. 11 at 7 p.m. she returns to Little Professor's for a book signing and discussion, which is open to the public free of charge.

"I'm just about finished adapting the book to the stage with original music (she is also a musician)," said Dewey, via phone on Monday. "The Times was the first publication to feature the book, right after it came out."

She and her book are the subject of a documentary on the paranormal that is currently in progress. Foreword magazine is doing a feature on her this month.

Dewey independently published and regionally marketed her book. She sold thousands of copies the first six months and hit the No. 2 on the bestseller list in Northern Michigan, the second week after it was published.

Hampton Roads Publishing company has picked up the book, which is slated for release next month. They plan on promoting it for Halloween.

What sets Aaron's Crossing apart from a typical ghost story is that it offers an inspirational message about life and death to its readers.

Dewey's tale of her encounter with a real ghost and his crossing is a refreshing alternative to the usual scary ghost stories. From their first interaction in an abandoned cemetery and her bold efforts to reach out to him through the subsequent journey of their friendship, Dewey communicates telepathically with Aaron and learns much about that to which most of us have no access. The story, as told to Dewey, of his life and death, time as a ghost, and his final crossing give a bright insight into otherworldliness.

From their first interaction in an abandoned cemetery in Northern Michigan, Dewey communicates telephathically with Aaron and learns much. The story, as told to Dewey, of his life and death, time as a ghost, and his final crossing give an insight into otherworldliness.

Even for nonbelievers, this book is a fun and entertaining read - a bit eerie at times, full of humor and fresh concepts. The author says, "The hardest thing in life is to learn which bridge to cross and which to burn."